Technical Document # - 3071019
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Family: Operating Systems
Product: OS/2 Warp
Release: 3.0
Syslevel: XR03000

Last Updated: 02/22/1999
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TITLE

OS/2 Warp Desktop Problems and Recovering User INI Files

DESCRIPTION

Various OS/2 Warp Desktop Problems and Recovery

RESOLUTION

Note: Make sure you have a backup of any file you intend to change.

Desktop Problems

Following are some problems you might have with the Desktop after
installing OS/2 Warp. Solutions are provided.


The System Stops and the Keyboard and Mouse Do Not Respond

1. Press Ctrl+Esc or Alt+Esc and wait a few seconds to see if
   the system responds.

2. Determine if you can move the mouse but cannot select any
   object when you press mouse button 1.

3. Press the
Caps Lock and Num Lock keys to see if their
  status lights come on.


4. Record what you were doing when the system stopped. If any

   messages were displayed on the screen, record the message
   text and number.
 

5. Refer to the Service and Support brochure in the OS/2
  package for instructions about calling for additional help.


Icons Are Missing 

After restarting the system, some of the Desktop icons are missing.

Check the documentation for the hard disk and controller card to
ensure their settings are both set for the ASYNCH mode or the
SYNCH mode.

Icons Are Stacked

If the objects on the Desktop appear to be stacked on each

other, you can refresh the Desktop:

1. Move the mouse pointer to a blank area of the Desktop; then
   press mouse button 2.

2. Select Refresh from the menu.

3. If the screen goes blank, press
Alt+Esc to switch between
   programs and force the "repainting" of the screen.

DOS and Windows Programs Were Not Added to the Desktop

During the installation of OS/2, the existing DOS and Windows

programs are automatically added to the OS/2 Desktop. However,
the Installation program might not find all programs; for
example, programs on remote servers. If this happens, restart
the system and run the Add Programs to Desktop utility program.
Add Programs to Desktop is in the System Setup folder, which
is in the OS/2 System folder.

OS/2 2.x Programs Were Not Added to the Desktop

If you installed OS/2 on a system that already had OS/2 2.x

installed, and the OS/2 2.x programs were not added to the
Desktop, do the following:

1. Turn on the computer, or press Ctrl+Alt+Del if it is
   already on.
 

2. When a small white box appears in the upper-left corner,
   press Alt+F1.

3. When the Recovery Choices screen appears, press C.


4. Delete the DESKTOP directory.


5. Press
Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart the system. The Desktop
  should be re-created.


6. If the problem continues, re-create the INI files as

   described in "Rebuilding Your Desktop" in this document.

Note: If you moved program groups off the Desktop and into a
      folder, you should move them back to the Desktop before
      installing OS/2. Otherwise, duplicate icons could appear
      on the screen. If you try to delete these icons, the
      original icons also will be deleted.

Desktop Is Blank or Objects Are Missing

If the Desktop is blank, objects are missing, you cannot delete

an object, or you have another program that involves objects,
run the CHKDSK (check disk) program until the results indicate
there are no errors. To run CHKDSK:

1. Insert the Installation Diskette in drive A; then press
   Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart the system.

2. When prompted, remove the
Installation Diskette and insert
   Diskette 1.

3. When the Welcome screen appears, press F3 to get to the
   command prompt.

4. Insert
Diskette 2; then type CHKDSK x:/F:2 and press
   Enter (x is the drive where OS/2 is installed.)

Object Cannot be Deleted

If you cannot delete an object:


1. Create a folder.

2. Drag the object you want to delete to the new folder and
   drop it.

3. Drag the new folder to the Shredder and drop it.


If you cannot shred the folder:

1. At an OS/2 command prompt, type CD DESKTOP and press Enter.

2. When the DESKTOP directory opens, type
RD directory and
   press Enter (directory is the name of the directory
  (folder) that you want to delete).


Recovery Procedures

The following procedures provide information for recovering from
Desktop problems and system failures, including:

* A damaged, unusable, or unstartable Desktop
* An invalid CONFIG.SYS file
* A damaged INI file
* Hard-disk errors
* A forgotten lockup password.


Note: Backing up the system regularly might help avoid having
      to re-create files if there is a system failure.

If your Desktop becomes damaged, unusable, or unstartable, you
can recover in two ways:

* Use the Archive/Recover utility program to restore the Desktop
  to a previously saved state.
 

* Rebuild the existing Desktop

Recovery Choices Screen

The Recovery Choices screen lets you specify how the system is
to restart while a restart is in progress. Display the Recovery
Choices screen during the restart by pressing Alt+F1 when the
small white box appears in the upper-left corner of the screen.
If you want the system to display the Recovery Choices screen
each time it restarts, select Display Recovery Choices At
Every System Restart on the Archive page of the Desktop
Settings notebook.

On the Recovery Choices screen, you can:

1. Select the set of archived system files that the system is to
   use to restart.
 

2. Continue using the originally installed system files to
   restart, and go to a command line.
 

3. Continue using the original installation files to restart,
  and reset the primary display to VGA.
 

4. Restart the system using a customized CONFIG.SYS file that
  you have created.


Each set of archived files appears on the Recovery Choices screen
with the date and time the files were archived. The choices are
numbered 1, 2, 3 or, for the original installation files, X.
Select the files that you want the system to restart with by
pressing 1, 2, 3, or X on the keyboard. The system continues to
restart using the set of archived files represented by the number
or character you pressed.

To go to a command line without changing the system files, press
C. To reset the primary display to VGA, press V.

The character keys are not case-sensitive.

To restart the system using a customized version of the
CONFIG.SYS file, type an alphabetic character that corresponds
to the name of a CONFIG.SYS file that you created.

Recovering Archived System Files

OS/2 can archive key system files as well as the DESKTOP
directory each time you start OS/2. The default setting for
this feature is OFF. (The Archive function can be turned ON by
using the Archive page of the Desktop Settings notebook.)


When the Archive function is turned ON, the state of the key
system files and Desktop are saved as they existed the last
three time OS/2 was started. Each time you restart OS/2, the
oldest set of archived system files is deleted, and the current

system files are saved. OS/2 also keeps a permanent archive of
the Desktop and key files as they existed when OS/2 was first
installed, so you can always restore the system to its original
state.

Symptoms

* Folders open and close immediately.
* Desktop objects are missing or empty, or multiple objects appear.

Shut down and then restart the computer. If this does not fix

the problem, see "Rebuilding Your Desktop" in this document.

Using Archived System Files

1. Turn on the computer. If it is already on, perform a shutdown;
   then press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart it.

2. When the small white box appears in the upper-left corner,
   press Alt+F1. A screen listing the three most-recent
   archives appears. Do one of the following:
           

   a. Type the number of the archive you want to use to restore
      the system.
           

   b. Type X to restore the system to its original state (as it
      was when you first installed OS/2).
           

   c. Type C to get an OS/2 command prompt (for example, if you
      want to edit the CONFIG.SYS file).
           

   d. Type V to reset the primary display to VGA (for example,
      if you think your Desktop is not damaged but cannot be
      seen because you need to reinstall your VGA device
      drivers).

Creating CONFIG.SYS Files

In some cases, you might need different CONFIG.SYS files to

create environments specific to the kinds of work you are doing.
For example, when you use a laptop computer with a docking
station, you might want two CONFIG.SYS files--one that supports
your laptop computer and one that supports your desktop computer.

You can create different versions of the CONFIG.SYS file and,
during restart, specify from the Recovery Choices screen which
version the system should use. You also can customize the
Recovery Choices screen to display your customized CONFIG.SYS
file choices.

The following steps describe how to create and use multiple
CONFIG.SYS files. In these steps, ? is any unique single
alphabetic character EXCEPT X, x, C, c, V, or v. These
steps use C as the root directory. If you installed OS/2 on
a drive other than C, replace C in the path name with the
drive letter of the root directory.

1. Save a copy of the current CONFIG.SYS file.

   You can copy the current CONFIG.SYS file to either a diskette
   or to the C:\OS\BOOT subdirectory. If you copy the file to
   C:\OS\BOOT, rename it to CONFIG.?. Be sure to make a note of
   the new name and directory so you can restore it later.

2. Type COPY C:CONFIG.SYS  C:\OS2\BOOT\CONFIG.? and press
   Enter. Customize the new file with the modifications that
   you need.

3. Copy the customized CONFIG.? file to the current CONFIG.SYS
  file.


   There are two ways to copy the CONFIG.? file. You can enter
  the Copy command at the OS/2 command prompt, or you can
  create an OS/2 batch file that runs during restart AFTER the

   system processes C:\CONFIG.SYS.

 
Replacing Your CONFIG.SYS File with CONFIG.?

   If you have only one customized CONFIG.? file, or if you do
   not plan to change between CONFIG.SYS and CONFIG.? often,
   you might choose to copy over CONFIG.SYS with the customized
   CONFIG.? file. Copying over C:\CONFIG.SYS with your customized
   file replaces the default CONFIG.SYS file. The command to copy
   your customized file to the current CONFIG.SYS file is:

      COPY C:\OS2\BOOT\CONFIG.? C:\CONFIG.SYS

   Using your customized CONFIG.? file as the default file lets
   you restart without selecting a CONFIG.? file at the Recovery
   Choices screen.

   You can now restart the system. When you restart, the system
   automatically uses the CONFIG.SYS file in the root directory.

   Creating a Batch File to Replace CONFIG.SYS with CONFIG.?

   If you have several customized CONFIG.SYS files, using a
   batch file allows you to specify the CONFIG.? you want to
   use without entering multiple copy commands. You can simply
   change the ? character in the batch file, and enter that
   character at the Recovery Choices screen.

   a. Create a batch file in the C:\OS2\BOOT subdirectory, and
      name it ALTF1?.CMD (? is the character you used in the
     name of the CONFIG.? file).


   b. Put the following command in the batch file:

         COPY C:\OS2\BOOT\CONFIG.? C:\CONFIG.SYS

   c. Press Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart the system. When the small
      white box appears in the upper-left corner, press Alt+F1
      to display the Recovery Choices screen.

   d. At the Recovery Choices screen, press the key for the ?
     character that is in the name of the CONFIG.? file you

      want to use.

   The system continues the restart using the customized
   CONFIG.? file.

   Note: If you enter a character at the Recovery Choices
         screen for which there is no corresponding CONFIG.?
         or ALTF1?.CMD batch file, the system returns to the
         Recovery Choices screen.

   Example:

  The following shows how to create a CONFIG.SYS file named

   CONFIG.A, and a batch file to copy it during restart. The
   system is installed on drive C. Before starting, save a
   copy of the current CONFIG.SYS file.

   a. Type the following and press Enter to copy the system
      version of CONFIG.SYS into a new file called CONFIG.A:

       
COPY CONFIG.SYS C:\OS2\BOOT\CONFIG.A

  b. Change to the C:\OS2\BOOT directory.


  c. Edit CONFIG.A to customize it; then save your changes.

   d. Type the following and press Enter to create the file,
      ALTF1A.CMD:

       
E ALTF1A.CMD

  e. Add the following commands to ALTF1A.CMD and save the

      changes:
     

         COPY C:\OS2\BOOT\CONFIG.A
       
C:\CONFIG.SYS

  f. Press
Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart the system. When the small
      white box appears in the upper-left corner, press Alt+F1
      to display the Recovery Choices screen.

  g. At the Recovery Choices screen, type
A.

Displaying Your CONFIG.SYS Choice on the Recovery Choices Screen

You can customize your Recovery Choices screen to display the

list of customized CONFIG.? files that you created. To customize
the Recovery Choices screen:

1. Edit the file, C:\OS2\BOOT\ALTF1BOT.SCR. (If you installed
   OS/2 on a drive other than C, specify THAT drive.)

2. Add a line for each CONFIG.? file that you created. Each line
   should include the alphabetic character that identifies that
   CONFIG.? file.

   You can add up to 6 lines of text to the bottom of this file.
   You might also want to include a brief, one-line description
   of when to use that version of the CONFIG.? file. For
   example, to display the option for the CONFIG.A file on the
   Recovery Choices screen, add the following to the file:

      C:\OS2\BOOT\ALTF1BOT.SCR

Method 1--Rebuilding the Desktop 

Use this procedure if you do not want to replace both the

CONFIG.SYS and Desktop. You do NOT lose your customization.

Symptoms

* Missing objects in the
OS/2 System Folder.

* Missing, empty, or multiple objects on the Desktop.
       

  Note: This problem might exist after performing Recovering
       
Archived System Files.

* At the final restart during installation, the system has a

  blank Desktop with or without a clock on the screen.

Procedure

1. Turn on the computer, or press
Ctrl+Alt+Del if it is already
   on.

2. When the small white box appears in the upper-left corner,
   press Alt+F1 to display the Recovery Choices screen.

3. At the Recovery Choices screen, press C.
 

4. Change to the OS/2 directory; then type the following
   commands, pressing Enter after each:

     
CD\OS2
     
MAKEINI OS2.INI INI.RC
     
MAKEINI OS2SYS.INI INISYS.RC

5.
Type the following and press Enter after each to delete the
   hidden file, WP?ROOT.?SF:

     
ATTRIB -h -s -r \WP?ROOT.?SF
     
DEL \WP?ROOT.?SF

6. Press
Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart the system.

Method 2--Using Temporary or Dummy INI Files

If you are having Desktop problems and want to determine if the
INI files are the cause, create temporary INI files (also
referred to as Dummy INI files).

1. Open an OS/2 Window.

2. At the command prompt, type the following and press Enter
  after each:


      CD\OS2
     
MAKEINI OS21.INI INI.RC
     
MAKEINI OS2SYS1.INI INISYS.RC

   Note: INI file names end with "1."

3. Type CD\ and press Enter.

4. Type E CONFIG.SYS and press Enter to edit the CONFIG.SYS
  file.


5. Change the following statements near top of the file:

      Change: SET USER_INI=C:\OS2\OS2.INI
     To:    
SET USER_INI=C:\OS2\OS21.INI

      Change: SET SYSTEM_INI=C:\OS2\OS2SYS.INI
     To:    
SET SYSTEM_INI=C:\OS2\OS2SYS1.INI

6. Select File, and then Save; then select Close.

7. Shut down and restart the system.

If the problem is solved, the INI files were at fault. Edit the
CONFIG.SYS file and return the statements changed in step 5 to
their original values; that is, remove the "1" from the file
names. Then replace the INI files as described under "Recovering
the User INI File" in the User's Guide to OS/2 Warp.

If the problem is NOT solved, the INI files were not at fault.
Something else is causing the problem.

If you have video distortion or corruption, you can reset video
to VGA:

1. Shut down and then restart your system. If you are unable to

   shut down, press Ctrl+Alt+Del, or turn the computer off,
   wait a few seconds, and then turn it back on.

2. When the small white box appears in the upper-left corner,
   press Alt+F1 to display the Recovery Choices screen.

3. At the Recovery Choices screen, type V. This resets video to
   VGA.

4. When the process is complete, restart the system.

You can set up the system for SVGA if the video adapter supports
higher resolutions. Contact the vendor of the video card to
ensure you have the correct and latest drivers, and that the
resolution is compatible in OS/2. If you have a utility or setup
program for your video, follow those instructions first.

Method 3--Recovering the CONFIG.SYS File

The CONFIG.SYS file contains command statements used to set up

the system during startup. If the file is changed incorrectly,
you might not be able to restart the system or edit the file.
For example, some programs write information to the CONFIG.SYS
file when they are installed. In some cases, this information
can cause the CONFIG.SYS file to be unusable. To recover the
original version of the CONFIG.SYS file (as it was created when
OS/2 was installed), do the following:

1. Turn on the computer, or press Ctrl+Alt+Del if it is
   already on.

2. When the small white box appears in the upper-left corner,
   press Alt+F1 to display the Recovery Choices screen.

3. At the Recovery Choices screen, press
C.

4. Rename the damaged CONFIG.SYS file. For example, type the

   following and press Enter:

     
REN CONFIG.SYS CONFIG.BAD

5. Type the following and press
Enter to copy the backup copy
   of the CONFIG.SYS file to the root directory of the drive
   where OS/2 is installed. (The CONFIG.SYS backup file was
   created during OS/2 installation.)

     
COPY C:\OS2\INSTALL\CONFIG.SYS C:\CONFIG.SYS

6. Press
Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart the system.

Note: If you made any changes to the CONFIG.SYS file after the
     original installation, you must edit the newly copied file

      and add those changes.

Method 4--Recovering the User INI File

The OS2.INI file, also referred to as the
user INI file, is an
operating-system startup file that contains such system settings
as program defaults, display options, and file options. The
OS2SYS.INI file, also referred to as the system INI file, is an
operating-system file that contains information about installed
fonts and printer drivers. If you ever receive a message that
the OS2.INI file has been corrupted, replace both the OS2.INI
file and the OS2SYS.INI file on the hard disk.

Use the following procedure to replace the two files with files
containing default values:

1.  Turn on the computer, or press Ctrl+Alt+Del if it is already
    on.

2.  When the small white box appears in the upper-left corner,
    press Alt+F1 to display the Recovery Choices screen.

3.  At the Recovery Choices screen, press
C.

4.  Type
CD \OS2 and press Enter.

5.  Type
ATTRIB -s -h-r OS2*.INI and press Enter.

6.  Type
REN OS2.INI OS2.OLD and press Enter.

7.  Type
MAKEINI OS2.INI INI.RC and press Enter.

8.  Type
REN OS2SYS.INI OS2SYS.OLD and press Enter.

9.  Type
MAKEINI OS2SYS.INI INISYS.RC and press Enter.

10. Press
Ctrl+Alt+Del to restart the system.

You can protect the INI files by having them automatically
backed up each time you start the system. For example, if you
include the following statements in the CONFIG.SYS file, a
backup copy of the current INI files, as well as a backup copy

of the INI files as they existed at the previous system startup,
will be made.

Note: This example assumes that OS/2 is installed on drive C.
      Use the letter of the drive on which OS/2 is installed.

   CALL=C:\OS2\XCOPY.EXE C:\OS2\*.INX C:\OS2\*.INY
 
CALL=C:\OS2\XCOPY.EXE C:\OS2\OS2*.INI C:\OS2\*.INX

By copying the INI files, you can always recover a recent
version of these files if the INI file becomes damaged.



Document Info

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